Posted in Culture, Peace Corps, school

International Friendships

“Do you have cheerleaders, like in the movies?  Can you show us a cheer?”

“Does your family really make wine at home?  How old are you when they let you drink some?”

ValerieQuestions such as these can be heard in Doamna Ecaterina’s room on Thursday afternoons at the meetings of the International VideoChat club.  Every other Thursday, Moldovan teens meet to converse with a group of high-school students in Alabama over Skype.

Katya

Some highlights: students from Cahul explained and displayed pictures of sarmale, placintă, and mămăliga, while the Americans described southern-style biscuits, grits and fried chicken. Although both groups are predominantly Christian, both “Orthodox” and “Baptist” required further explanation. Moldovan students sang “Eroina Mea”.  Alabaman teens demonstrated their favorite dance moves.  My favorite moment so far has been the two groups singing Ed Sheeran’s “Perfect” in unison… on opposite sides of the world!  The teens are learning fascinating and unique things about each other’s culture, but also that they have many things in common!

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“What do y’all think about our accent?”

On alternate weeks, between conversations with the high-schoolers, club members have opportunities to interview English-speaking women about their jobs.

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Interviewing the General

They’ve spoken with a software engineer, a lawyer, and a retired general so far.   While these passionate, dedicated women answered questions about their jobs and their lives, the teens have developed interview skills, but also heard a lot of wonderful advice about education, employment, and life!

Peace Corps’ mission is to promote world peace and friendship. I think an awesome way to do that is through personal connections.  Showing off dance moves.  Swapping recipes.  Listening to stories about someone’s life.  Sharing a song.

Posted in celebrations, Language, Peace Corps, school

In Their Own Words

In 100 words, write about a tradition in Moldova you would like a foreigner to learn about.

These were the words of a homework assignment in the 8th Grade English textbook recently.  The class had studied celebrations in English-speaking countries and now it was time to share what they knew about their own celebrations (while practicing English, of course!) “Hmmm….”  I said to my partner teacher, “What if we give them the opportunity to really share their thoughts with foreigners?”  So here we have, especially for my “foreign” readers, some fascinating Moldovan traditions, as described by three outstanding 8th grade students, in their own words:

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“Marțișor” by Valeria C.
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“Easter”by Lucian C.
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“Marțișor” by Anastasia D.
Posted in celebrations, Culture, Peace Corps

Marțișoare

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Butterfly marțisor I gave my partner.

Yesterday was the first of March.  Here in Moldova, this is the day when folks say goodbye to winter and greet the spring.  One way to do this is by exchanging little red-and-white pins called  Marțișoare* (singular marțișor) with friends.

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My host mom gave me this one!

As you can see, they take many forms, but the common theme is red and white intertwined cords, and usually a red and a white tassel.  Small broaches are exchanged by friends, and larger versions are used as decorations.  The most commonly heard legend behind the tradition goes something like this:

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My Romanian teacher and my site-mate wearing marțișoare they received today.

Once in a fight with the winter witch, who didn’t want to give up her place, the beautiful lady Spring cut her finger and few drops of her blood the first spring snowdrop poking its head up through the snow. The snowdrop charmed the winter witch and in this way Spring conquered Winter. Source: http://www.Moldova.org 

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A display of many marțișoare made by the elementary school students at my school.

So the red dangles represent the red and white snowdrop flowers that grew in the story.  A short version of the red-and-white theme might be: “Goodbye white Winter, hello vibrant, living Spring!”

I felt very loved yesterday, as I received FIVE marțișoare from my partner, my host mom, the school director, the ladies in my Adult English class, and another volunteer!

Giant Marțișor in the shopping center.

Meanwhile, outside it continues to snow.  I guess the marțișoare will help us keep Spring in our hearts, whatever the weather!

*approximate pronunciation: “mar-tsee-shore”  plural “mar-tsee-shwa-ray”

Posted in Life & Such, Peace Corps, school

English Circle

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“Me, me, I know the answer!”

What if we could get kids excited about English?  This was my thought when one of the 5th grade homeroom teachers approached my partner and I about homework help in English for her class.  My partner, being very awesome, but also extremely busy, asked if I could help them out.  To tell the truth, I’ve missed working with kids, since my background is in primary education and I only have a few classes with them now, so I gladly said yes, but asked if we could expand it to include all of the interested 5th graders.  And our Cerc de Engleza* (English Circle) was born.

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This says “bring,” so…. “brought!”

Each Wednesday we meet for 45 minutes after school have fun practicing grammar.  Yeah, you read that right.  The idea is to take whatever grammar point (or sometimes vocabulary) they have been working with in class and find engaging games and activities to practice that point. For example, the photos on this page show a team game of Online Hangman to review the names of animals, and a board game to practice irregular past tense verbs. As you can see in the photos, it’s working!  The kids love it!  And I look forward every week to “playing” with them!  😉

*approximate pronunciation: “cherck day en-glay-zah”

Posted in Peace Corps, school

Back to back

I just learned a new technique! If your students are seated in pairs, how do you discourage copying on tests? In this fourth grade class, the teacher called out “back to back!” and students took their test sitting like this:

Posted in Peace Corps, People, school

School Days

So, what am I here to do?  Well, according to the official documents, two of the goals of the Peace Corps English Education Program here in Moldova (paraphrased) are to improve students’ English, and to  help teachers incorporate some new techniques into their teaching (with a focus on student involvement and critical thinking).  Every once in a while, I notice something like that happening AND remember to take a picture.  So for those of you who were wondering what I’m actually doing here….  here are a few glimpses. (Click for larger pictures or mouse-over to see the captions.  On second thought, just click.  It works better that way.)